Case Rim Damage

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GuitarmanNick
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Case Rim Damage

Post by GuitarmanNick » April 16th, 2019, 6:06 pm

I have been reloading my saved brass from my P-64 and noticed that most of the case rims have sharp marks on them. I am guessing this is from the extractor.
Any input on how to minimize this would be appreciated.
I am considering taking a stone to the extractor and rounding over any sharp points.
Thought I would see what the experts have to say, first.

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Weasel640
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Re: Case Rim Damage

Post by Weasel640 » April 17th, 2019, 12:02 am

You might also consider replacing the Extractor Spring with a lighter one from a comparable pistol. The Extractor on these are a beast. Save the original spring so you can swap it back in if needed.
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superc
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Re: Case Rim Damage

Post by superc » May 5th, 2019, 7:14 am

These were pistols for military use with non predictable ammunition sources. Reloading the ammunition afterwards is not something the Warsaw Pact envisioned. Reliability of parts function was.

GuitarmanNick
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Re: Case Rim Damage

Post by GuitarmanNick » May 5th, 2019, 9:16 am

Since the cases are not damaged by those shooting other P-64s, this indicates there is a problem with my particular gun.

After doing some close inspection I took the stones to the extractor and ejector which had a very sharp point on it and is likely the culprit. I just removed the sharp edges with a few passes of the stone. I have not been to the range yet, but will report on my findings in the next couple of weeks.

For any ammunition to be reloadable, the brass must survive the initial firing. If it is damaged, an inspection of the firearm will usually reveal the cause and in most cases can be corrected. Gun makers may not consider reloading when producing guns, but they surely want them to function smoothly which translates into reliability. Minimizing friction is important when getting ammo to feed and eject rapidly and sharp edges do not contribute to smooth function. IMO, if the ammo ejects easily and the cases are undamaged, then the gun is running as designed. Damaged cases are an indication of a problem which may require attention.

Some military weapons were made quickly and little attention was given to fit and finish. The P-64 is not one of those weapons! It was made to very consistent standards. Parts easily interchange between firearms without fitment issues.

The reason I bought Red Army Elite was for the "reloadable"(as noted in their product description) Boxer brass cases. As with most "military" designated ammunition, reliability was the main requirement. This is generally achieved on mass produced items by maintaining very strict production standards using quality materials.

I like to have the ability to reload for all of my guns in case of some future supply problem.

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