Mystery 'chamber wear'

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Brehon1
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Re: Mystery 'chamber wear'

Post by Brehon1 » September 4th, 2011, 3:58 pm

Hate to admit this... After going to the range with the Mosin and almost having to step on the bolt to get it free (left some cosmoline in the chamber) I tried everything, but what finally worked was to aim my pressure washer into the chamber to flush out the cosmoline I couldn't reach. Probably a hundred reasons not to do that.. Worked like a charm.

p64haspummeledme
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Joined: June 25th, 2018, 1:45 am

Re: Mystery 'chamber wear'

Post by p64haspummeledme » June 27th, 2018, 12:07 am

I recently acquired a 1967 P-64 that had that "peened" damage on the throat of the barrel, the worst was in the 10 o'clock position on the throat. These impact damages on the throat were caused by careless release of the slide when either taking it (the slide) off or putting it on, causing the impact of sufficiently high velocity to cause the damage. If the "peen" impact on the throat was sufficiently hard to put a burr ON THE INSIDE OF THE THROAT there IS a problem that needs to be repaired. A quick test to see if the burr is interfering with the bullet properly seating in the throat mouth is very easy. Simply insert a 9x18 round into the throat and see if it seats at the proper level. You may not KNOW what a proper level is unless you have an undamaged barrel to compare how far your bullet should seat. Fortunately there is another method... take a small flashlight and shine it on the throat opening while looking down the muzzle from the other end. If you can SEE the impact burr visible from the muzzle end, it most likely will prevent your bullet from seating properly in the throat mouth. A small gunsmithing file used very carefully can remove the obstruction. Flitz or 0000 steel wool can be used for the finishing smooth up work. I am 100% convinced steel cased ammo DID NOT create the damage in the area I described previously! Be careful and enjoy your P-64!

GuitarmanNick
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Re: Mystery 'chamber wear'

Post by GuitarmanNick » July 1st, 2018, 8:24 am

Next time you fire the Mosin, try pulling straight back on the safety before trying to release the bolt. It will cock the hammer and allow the bolt to open much easier. It is how the Russians were trained to cycle the gun in order to keep the sights on target between shots.

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Weasel640
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Re: Mystery 'chamber wear'

Post by Weasel640 » July 1st, 2018, 12:14 pm

GuitarmanNick wrote:
July 1st, 2018, 8:24 am
Next time you fire the Mosin, try pulling straight back on the safety before trying to release the bolt. It will cock the hammer and allow the bolt to open much easier. It is how the Russians were trained to cycle the gun in order to keep the sights on target between shots.
What are you replying to?
Weasel

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GuitarmanNick
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Re: Mystery 'chamber wear'

Post by GuitarmanNick » July 2nd, 2018, 12:17 pm

I was replying to Brehon1. Even when all of the cosmoline has been removed, on most Mosin-Nagants it will be difficult to release the bolt after firing even on an empty chamber. Polishing some surfaces will help, but the procedure I described works on any bolt. Polishing parts on old weapons is frowned upon by some and could take away from the value.

Thought it may be helpful to know the next time he takes it to the range.

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